Archive for the travel Category

Winter Orchard

Posted in Haunting, Hope, Images, Memories, new beginnings, photography, travel on December 21, 2007 by anuvuestudio

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Tombstone: Too Tough to Die

Posted in Colt Thunder, Cowboys, Doc Holiday, Dreamer, eclectic, entertainment, Gunslingers, Hanging out, History, Images, Life, Memories, O.K. Corral, Personal, photography, Time Travelers, Tombstone, Too tough to die, travel, Uncategorized, Unusual, Western on December 17, 2007 by anuvuestudio

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When you hear the name Tombstone, it makes you think of gunfights on dusty streets and the romance of the Old West with characters like Wyatt Earp and Doc Holiday. Tombstone itself was formed around an area called Goose Flats, after a prospector named Ed Schieffelin, discovered a wealth of silver in 1877. He was warned of only finding his “tombstone” while searching for his treasure.

Tombstone is legendary for many things but none more so than the most famous shootout in the History of the American West…the Gunfight at the O.K.Corral. The gunfight itself happened at about 3pm, Wednesday, October 26th, 1881 in a vacant lot behind the corral in Tombstone. About 30 shots were fired in about 30 seconds. The gunfighters, Wyatt Earp, Morgan Earp, Virgil Earp and Doc Holiday fought Frank McLaury, Tom McLaury, Billy Clairborne, Ike Clanton and Billy Clanton. Ike Clanton and Billy Clairborne (who later claimed he had been unarmed though reports credit him with shooting one of more times) ran away from the fight, unharmed. Both McLaurys and Billy Clanton were killed and Morgan Earp, Virgil Earp and Doc Holiday were wounded.

Of all these infamous Cowboys of the West, Doc Holiday has always held the most interest for me personally. Wyatt Earp was quoted once saying “He was a dentist whom necessity had made a gambler; a gentleman whom disease had made a vagabond; a philosopher whom life had made a caustic wit…” Famous Gambling legend Bat Masterson (one of my favorite tv shows as a kid) was quoted as saying “Doc had but three redeeming traits. One was his courage; He was afraid of nothing on Earth. The second was the one commendable principle in his code of life, sterling loyalty to friends. The third was his affection for Wyatt Earp”.

Doc stood about 6 feet tall and despite all movies, he was a fair haired, platinum blond, built long and lean. Doc’s weapon of choice in his early days was an 1851 Colt Navy revolver given to him by his Uncle. Later in his western career, he carried a nickel-plated .41 caliber Colt Thunder or the .38 caliber Colt Lightening, both double action pistols. He never chose to use a shotgun but was handed one by Virgil Earp during the famous battle, which after firing one shot, threw down the gun in disgust and jerked the nickel-plated Colt, his favorite weapon.

Doc is known to all of us (who’ve watched the most recent Tombstone movie) as a bit of a wise guy with sayings like “I’ll be your Huckleberry” and also making reference to the term “Daisy”. Eye and ear witnesses present at this shooting say that when confronted by Frank McLaury at the gunfight, Doc’s reply to McLaury’s challenge “I’ve got you now!” was “Blaze away! You’re a daisy if you have”! Back then the slang “Daisy” referred to “the best in it’s class” or condensed to “the best”. His celebrated line “I’m your Huckleberry” was also a slang term meaning “I’m just the man you’re looking for”!

It was my privilege to walk down the same streets once walked by these legends and get to see this famous old town. The old courthouse is completely intact, along with the gallows in the courtyard. Allen street is still dusty, lined with buildings from the past, including the spot where the O.K. Corral stood. I looked very much the part as I walked it sporting my new black “Wyatt” hat while holding onto my newly minted “Tombstone Sheriff” badge. Sadly, my mystique wore off quickly when it blew off my head in a strong wind (or was pushed off by an old ghost) and I had to chase it damn near that whole street. I’m sure this “City Slicker” made the “Townies” days. 😉

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Tombstone’s Boot Hill

Posted in Attitude, comment, Contradiction, Death, Dreamer, good grief, History, Life, opinion, thoughts, travel, Uncategorized, wisdom on December 16, 2007 by anuvuestudio

One of the few precious childhood memories I have is of wearing a holster with two 6 shooters, a black suede, fringed vest sporting a most beloved sheriff badge, a pair of black cowboy boots and my head topped with a beautifully embroidered black cowboy hat. Now back then, as is still now the case, I tried never to take sides when the choice between good and evil was blurred. Even as a small child of 5… I alternated back and forth between my cowboy getup and my giant colorful Chieftain headdress with feathers that ran all the way down my back, accompanied by my war drum and bow and arrows. I do have to admit, I always wore the vest with that badge, regardless of the rest of the ensemble. Kinda Switzerland even then.

This past week we were lucky enough to go back in time (if you will) to the land of Cowboys and Indians. Crossing plains that Geronimo, Cochise and Sitting Bull rode over and visiting towns that Billy the Kid and Bat Masterson gambled in…well that’s just plain old cool stuff to someone who loves history. Along the way there were characters who take this stuff mighty serious and have tried their darn best to preserve what’s left for people like you and me to enjoy. I saw things that saddened me, some that plain angered me and things that absolutely enchanted me. I’ll do my best to share them with you…a little at a time.

Upon arriving in Tombstone, the first destination was Boot Hill. Now, if you don’t know what Boot Hill is (or was) it’s a place of rest for some of the most notorious gunslingers and even some innocents that died in childbirth, or of cholera…or even hung without cause… all in one large graveyard. Many old western grave-sites are referred to as “Boot Hill” but to me… there’s always been only one. Now I’m here to say that sadly Boot Hill was left for many years to decay, and in it’s forlorn state, some well meaning folks resurrected these old grave-sites and now everything is completely new. I asked an old Cowboy caretaker inside, with as much patience as I could muster…”Why?”. He told me with equal patience (for a City slicker) that the graves were destroyed, lost forever and had to be researched and rebuilt. He had no idea I currently have 5 of my Father’s vintage rifles in my closet and I take History quite serious. I think in the end we came to understand each other and each loved this place in our own way. He passed me a little map and we followed it on the trail to all those laid in infamy.

As we walked, I could not help being angry. Why would people let something so important to this country’s roots…disappear? Why is there so much money spent on things like researching who used steroids in Baseball (when they weren’t even illegal and who bloody cares anyway?) or analyzing trendy colors and names for the next generation of cell phones…but no one see the significance in holding on to something so precious? Why leave history keeping in the hands of folks with barely enough funds to live on, let alone try to finance the restoration of the most famous American Western Grave Site in the US? WHY? That’s a question someone in power needs to answer to to our Children, our Grandchildren and those beyond. Me, I’d just do the obvious. I’d make sure they had the cash to restore it properly.

I have no photos to share of Boot Hill. Nothing to give you an idea of where Gunslingers like Frank McLaury, Tom McLaury and Billy Claiborn were laid to rest after dying in the most famous gun battle in American Western History. I left without taking a single one. I have only some words and the memory of yellow crosses made of simple wood and piles of rocks, tenderly laid by well meaning folks… paying a simple man’s homage to the bones that lie beneath.

AS YOU-PASS-BY
REMEMBER-THAT-AS
YOU ARE

SO-ONCE-WAS -I
AND-AS-I AM-

YOU SOON-WILL-BE
REMEMBER-ME

2008 Calendar

Posted in Art, create, Dreamer, eclectic, Famiiy, Friends, Hobby, Hope, Images, Life, Memories, new beginnings, New Year, Personal, photography, Random, travel, Uncategorized on November 30, 2007 by anuvuestudio

Each year I set aside some of my favorite photos to make a desk calendar. It’s sometimes hard to decide because some hold a special memory… and only I can know what that is. It may not translate to the viewer beyond me.

This calendar also gets into the hands of some of the sales people I work with and they in turn pass them on to their customers. Therefore, sometimes decisions are also swayed by what others may like…or what could be offensive to some, though I rarely shoot that type of image.

This year I have decided to go with what I like…and if they don’t… well that’s a choice, isn’t it?

The cover will be a very simple solid black page with a wonderful quote from the magnificent T.S. Elliot…How can I go wrong…

For last year’s words belong to last year’s language
And next year’s words await another voice.
And to make an end is to make a beginning.

T.S. Eliot

Anyway, after many after-thoughts and lip biting, second guesses…and then arriving back where I started…this is my calendar for 2008

I can’t even remember my correct order of months…but I will try 😉

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January: Under the Pier, Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia February: Little White Church, Prince Edward Is. March: Laundry Day, Nova Scotia

April: Red Barn, Iowa May: Jack, Route 66 June: In Memory, Santa Monica Pier July: From the Rooftops, Montreal

August: Roy’s Cafe and Motel, Amboy September: Windmill, Wyoming Plains October: My Father’s Orchid

November: Miko leads the Way, Route 66 December: Ghost Town, Bodie in Winter

The Time Travelers

Posted in authors, creative, Dreamer, Friends, History, new beginnings, Random, Time Travelers, travel, Uncategorized, Visionary, writing on November 28, 2007 by anuvuestudio

There are people in this world you love and there are people you respect and then there are people you would give your life for. I have 3 such friends I’ve know most all of my life. Shiela would be one. I met Shiela in the 7th grade. She was in my homeroom class and she sat underneath the big clock on the wall. I apparently was a clock watcher. From that homeroom connection, we have been buds through life, as children, teens and to the women we are today.

Shiela is a very talented Artist. She is a painter, a sculpture and now, an author and I could not be more proud. Her two children grew up in the public school system and though they received a wonderful education, she felt that there should be more. A 6 year old child, wishing to meet a Pilgrim from a story read in class, lead to her making a costume and writing a script for a friend to come “meet” with the kids. She soon joined forces with Joyce Costanza, another mom and a very talented writer. Time Travelers was two years in the making for these two women and I was proud to be a part of seeing it through production and printing…but never happier than when I took the call after knowing they held their first printed book in their hands.

Time travelers allows children to meet people Like Old Abe, as a real life character…. Had it been available to schools sooner, I may not have watched that clock so much! PLEASE check out the very hard work these women accomplished under Shiela in my blogroll.

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From my window

Posted in City Lights, create, Dreamer, Images, Memories, Night, Personal, photography, Rooftop, solitude, travel, Uncategorized on November 26, 2007 by anuvuestudio

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Underdock Color

Posted in Art, create, eclectic, Images, Memories, Personal, photography, Random, travel, Unusual on November 25, 2007 by anuvuestudio

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George Eastman House

Posted in create, Dreamer, Images, inventor, Personal, photography, travel, Uncategorized, Visionary, wisdom on November 17, 2007 by anuvuestudio

Eastman was born in Waterville, Oneida County, New York. He was the fourth and youngest child of George Washington Eastman and Maria Kilbourn, both from the bordering town of Marshall. His third sister died shortly after her birth. In 1854, his father established the Eastman Commercial College in Rochester and the Eastman family moved to Rochester in 1865. Two years later, his father died, which left the family with little income and Eastman left high school to support the family. He began working as an office boy by the age of 14.

In 1874, Eastman became intrigued with photography but was frustrated by the awkward process. It required coating a glass plate with a liquid emulsion, that had to be used before it dried. After three years of experimentation with British gelatin emulsions, he developed a dry photographic plate, patented it in both England and the US, and began a photographic business in 1880.

In 1884, he patented a photographic medium that replaced fragile glass plates with a photo-emulsion coated on paper rolls. The invention of roll film greatly speeded up the process of recording multiple images.

Eastman received a patent in 1888 for his roll film camera. He coined the marketing phrase “You press the button, we do the rest.” The phrase entered the public consciousness, and was even incorporated into a Gilbert & Sullivan operetta (Utopia, Limited). The camera owner could return it with a processing fee of $10, and the company would develop the film and return 100 pictures, along with a new roll of 100 exposures.

On September 4, 1888 Eastman registered the trademark Kodak. The letter “O” had been a favorite of Eastman’s, he is quoted in saying, “it seems a round, endless sort of letter”. He and his mother devised the name Kodak with an anagram set. He said that there were three principal concepts he used in creating the name: it must be short, you can not mispronounce it, and it could not resemble anything or be associated with anything but Kodak.

By 1896, 100 Kodak cameras had been sold. The first Kodak had cost USD $15. The pocket camera now cost $0.50. In an effort to bring photography to the masses, Eastman introduced the Brownie in 1900 at a price of just $1. It became a great success.

In 1925, Eastman gave up his daily management of Kodak, to become chairman of the board. He thereafter concentrated on philanthropic activities, to which he had already donated substantial sums. He was one of the major philanthropists of his time, ranking only slightly behind Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and a few others, but did not seek publicity for his activities. He concentrated on institution-building and causes which could help people’s health. He donated to the University of Rochester, establishing the Eastman School of Music and School of Dentistry; to Tuskegee Institute; and made major donations to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which helped build several of their first buildings at their second campus along the Charles River.

In his final two years Eastman was in intense pain. He had trouble standing and his walking became a slow shuffle. It was caused by a degenerative disorder affecting his spine. Today it might be diagnosed as spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal canal caused by calcification in the vertebrae. Eastman grew depressed, as he had seen his mother spend the last two years of her life in a wheelchair from the same condition. On March 14, 1932, Eastman committed suicide using an automatic pistol. He left a suicide note that read, “To my Friends, My work is done. Why wait?” His funeral was held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Rochester. Eastman, who never married, is buried on the grounds of the company he founded at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York.

After his death in 1932, Eastman left his house to the University of Rochester. In 1947, the house was chartered as a photgraphic museum by the State of New York. In 1989, a new building was completed on the property to display and house the Museum’s growing collection of photographs, photographic equipment, books and motion pictures.

A 14 month house restoration, completed in January 1990 at a cost of $1.7 million, was intended to present Eastman’s house as a memorial to the man who lived here. A nationwide search resulted in the recovery of many of Eastman’s belongings once thought lost or destroyed. What you see below is a small portion of the house as it stands today. I can tell you it was extremely nerve racking to take photos in a place of such renown in the study of photography. I made these very quickly just to keep the memory.

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Fading

Posted in create, Dreamer, Haunted, Hope, Images, Life, Memories, Personal, photography, solitude, thoughts, travel on November 11, 2007 by anuvuestudio

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Know Not what…

Posted in create, Dreamer, Hope, Images, Life, Memories, Personal, photography, Random, solitude, thoughts, travel, Uncategorized, wisdom on November 11, 2007 by anuvuestudio

As I travel down life’s pathway,
Know not what the years may hold.
As I ponder, hopes grow fonder,
Precious memories flood my soul

Bob Dylan

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